Knowledge Mobilization


Why Historians Shouldn’t Count on the Kindle: Digital Reading and Historical Scholarship

This is a follow up on a previous post on e-book readers and the future of reading for historical researchers. Emerging digital reading technologies hold great potential to improve historical scholarship, but these developments should not be confused with developments in the consumer electronics industry. New electronic reading devices, including […]


Finding a Wider Audience for Historical Research

Academic historical research does not usually reach a very wide audience. Some of the best work in Canadian and environmental history, produced by the country’s top scholars, can almost only be found in the pages of scholarly journals and university press monographs. From time to time, a historian will break […]


Whose Library? The University of Toronto Library Fee Fiasco

Should publicly-funded Canadian university libraries charge fees for use? Should graduate students from other Canadian universities have to pay those fees? These are the questions being raised by graduate students at York University in Toronto, Ontario who face a proposed new fee to use the library resources at the University […]


Speak Out: Canadian Copyright Consultations End September 13th

I meant to write about this earlier in the summer, but there is still time. Industry Minister Tony Clement and Heritage Minister James Moore launched a public consultation process on copyright policy on July 20th. Following the government’s failed efforts to quietly revise Canadian copyright law last year through Bill […]


"What then are the digital skills every history graduate student needs to know?"

John Lutz asks this very question in the most recent issue of the Canadian Historical Association Bulletin. Lutz takes historians to task for failing to adequately prepare their graduate students for both the present and future of digital history. It is bad enough, as Lutz argues, “that the current professoriate […]


Will Twitter Kill My Chance of Getting an Academic Job?

Remember a couple of years ago when there was a lot of discussion about employers using internet-based social networks, like Facebook and MySpace, to screen job applicants? We were advised to use these so-called Web 2.0 tools cautiously to avoid the possibility of a potential employer discovering embarrassing photos or […]


The Place to Start: Bailey's Open Access Bibliography

I really should have found this source sooner. Charles W. Bailey’s Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals is the best place to start for historians (or anyone else) looking to learn about open access and scholarly publishing. According to the description of the book, […]


Public Knowledge Project Conference 2009: Reflections

As promised, I have put together some general reflections on the recent Public Knowledge Project conference held in Vancouver from July 8th-10th. I attended the conference as part of my work on the Notes on Knowledge Mobilization page on the NiCHE website. I went to the conference with the intention […]


PKP Conference Notes: Rowland Lorimer and a New Journal

Rowland Lorimer, director of the Canadian Centre for Studies in Publishing, announced the beginning of a new journal called Scholarly Research and Communication at the Public Knowledge Project conference this afternoon. Lorimer’s closing keynote for the conference was a pretty rousing tour of the history of scholarly publishing and the […]