Scholarly Publishing


Textbooks in a Digital Age: The History of Canada Online

Digital technologies are changing the way we read history. With the popularization of consumer electronic e-readers like Kindle, Sony Reader, Kobo, and (yes) iPad, many textbook publishers are trying to take advantage of this opportunity to reach digital reading audiences. Unfortunately, the Kindle DX digital textbook pilot program at Princeton […]


Finding a Wider Audience for Historical Research

Academic historical research does not usually reach a very wide audience. Some of the best work in Canadian and environmental history, produced by the country’s top scholars, can almost only be found in the pages of scholarly journals and university press monographs. From time to time, a historian will break […]


Will Twitter Kill My Chance of Getting an Academic Job?

Remember a couple of years ago when there was a lot of discussion about employers using internet-based social networks, like Facebook and MySpace, to screen job applicants? We were advised to use these so-called Web 2.0 tools cautiously to avoid the possibility of a potential employer discovering embarrassing photos or […]


The Place to Start: Bailey's Open Access Bibliography

I really should have found this source sooner. Charles W. Bailey’s Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals is the best place to start for historians (or anyone else) looking to learn about open access and scholarly publishing. According to the description of the book, […]


Public Knowledge Project Conference 2009: Reflections

As promised, I have put together some general reflections on the recent Public Knowledge Project conference held in Vancouver from July 8th-10th. I attended the conference as part of my work on the Notes on Knowledge Mobilization page on the NiCHE website. I went to the conference with the intention […]


PKP Conference Notes: Rowland Lorimer and a New Journal

Rowland Lorimer, director of the Canadian Centre for Studies in Publishing, announced the beginning of a new journal called Scholarly Research and Communication at the Public Knowledge Project conference this afternoon. Lorimer’s closing keynote for the conference was a pretty rousing tour of the history of scholarly publishing and the […]


PKP Conference Notes: The Economics of Open Access Publishing for Scholarly Communications

This morning, I attended a very interesting session on the economics of open access publishing for scholarly communications at the Public Knowledge Project conference in Vancouver. The session began with a presentation from Heather Morrison, who spoke about the broad ideas and macroeconomic view of open access publishing for scholarly […]