Copyright


Speak Out: Canadian Copyright Consultations End September 13th

I meant to write about this earlier in the summer, but there is still time. Industry Minister Tony Clement and Heritage Minister James Moore launched a public consultation process on copyright policy on July 20th. Following the government’s failed efforts to quietly revise Canadian copyright law last year through Bill […]


The Place to Start: Bailey's Open Access Bibliography

I really should have found this source sooner. Charles W. Bailey’s Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals is the best place to start for historians (or anyone else) looking to learn about open access and scholarly publishing. According to the description of the book, […]


Public Knowledge Project Conference 2009: Reflections

As promised, I have put together some general reflections on the recent Public Knowledge Project conference held in Vancouver from July 8th-10th. I attended the conference as part of my work on the Notes on Knowledge Mobilization page on the NiCHE website. I went to the conference with the intention […]


PKP Conference Notes: Rowland Lorimer and a New Journal

Rowland Lorimer, director of the Canadian Centre for Studies in Publishing, announced the beginning of a new journal called Scholarly Research and Communication at the Public Knowledge Project conference this afternoon. Lorimer’s closing keynote for the conference was a pretty rousing tour of the history of scholarly publishing and the […]


PKP Conference Notes: The Economics of Open Access Publishing for Scholarly Communications

This morning, I attended a very interesting session on the economics of open access publishing for scholarly communications at the Public Knowledge Project conference in Vancouver. The session began with a presentation from Heather Morrison, who spoke about the broad ideas and macroeconomic view of open access publishing for scholarly […]


PKP Conference Notes: Highlights and Athabasca University Press

The first full day of the Public Knowledge Project conference in Vancouver was indeed a very full day. Here are some of the highlights from what I saw today: Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o spoke about the impact of digital publishing and open access on the dissemination of writing in non-Western languages […]


PKP Conference Notes: Willinsky on the Intellectual Property of Learning

This evening, John Willinsky opened the Public Knowledge Project conference at the Morris J. Wosk Centre for Dialogue in downtown Vancouver. Professor Willinsky’s keynote address, titled “Free? What’s So Special About Learning? The Intellectual Property Argument”, outlined a new way of thinking about the debate over open-access in scholarly publishing. […]