Nature’s Past Episode 51: Has Environmental History Lost Its Way?


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Episode 51: Has Environmental History Lost Its Way? [53:04]

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Hiking, Olympic National Park, 1945-1965. Source: General Subjects Photograph Collection, 1845-2005, AR-28001001-ph001712, Washington State Archives. Original images held at the Washington State Archives, Olympia, WA.

Hiking, Olympic National Park, 1945-1965. Source: General Subjects Photograph Collection, 1845-2005, AR-28001001-ph001712, Washington State Archives. Original images held at the Washington State Archives, Olympia, WA.

Late last year in December, Lisa Brady, the editor of the journal, Environmental History, posted a provocatively titled blog article, “Has Environmental History Lost Its Way?” In that article, she reviews a round table panel from the most recent annual meeting of the Organization of American Historians in which Mark Hersey, a historian from Mississippi State University challenged the audience to consider whether or not environmental history has broadened too widely in its scope and drifted from its methodological roots.

Two years earlier, Liza Piper, a Canadian environmental historian from University of Alberta, wrote a similarly provocative article in History Compass in which she argues “that Canadian environmental historians, even as they foreground nature as an historical actor, nevertheless continue to focus their attention and orient their investigations around questions of how human social, cultural, economic, and political power reshaped both nature and human experience in the past.”

These arguments garnered lots of attention online as environmental historians shared the link to Brady’s article via online social networks and discussed its arguments. Others have now written response articles attempting to answer her question. The discussion has focused on the question of whether environmental history should emphasize materialism and the use of environment as an analytical lens or proceed as a “big tent” that incorporates a wide range of scholarship regardless of methodology.

On this episode of the podcast, Lisa Brady, Mark Hersey, and Liza Piper discuss this question and further explore whether or not environmental history has lost its way.

Please be sure to take a moment to review this podcast on our iTunes page.

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Guests:

Lisa Brady
Mark Hersey
Liza Piper

Works Cited:

Music Credits:

Citation:

Kheraj, Sean. “Episode 51: Has Environmental History Lost Its Way?” Nature’s Past: Canadian Environmental History Podcast. 27 January 2016.

 

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